126 Oxford Terrace, Christchurch

Club History

When attempts by a group of young women to gain the attention of The Bandit went unnoticed, the women streaked on to the field. Whereupon one young woman “Aayushi” (ironically meaning “one with long life”) was struck and killed instantly by what would have most certainly been an equalizing goal by The Bandit. Instead the game was halted, never to be resumed and perhaps most importantly, never recorded as a victory to the opposing team, thus maintaining The Badgers unbeaten record.

July 19, 1865
FIRST RECORDED “STREAK” IN POLO ENDS IN TRAGEDY

When attempts by a group of young women to gain the attention of The Bandit went unnoticed, the women streaked on to the field. Whereupon one young woman “Aayushi” (ironically meaning “one with long life”) was struck and killed instantly by what would have most certainly been an equalizing goal by The Bandit. Instead the game was halted, never to be resumed and perhaps most importantly, never recorded as a victory to the opposing team, thus maintaining The Badgers unbeaten record.

July 19, 1865
FIRST RECORDED “STREAK” IN POLO ENDS IN TRAGEDY

The Dragon Guards are invited for an exhibition rematch to which they decline. Instead, the famous Jodhpur club accepts an invitation and brings with them a worthy opponent along with hot as mustard form. With upwards of a 150 000 strong crowd and two teams at their peak, a thrilling match is narrowly won by the Badgers, in a game that is often described as“ the best ever”.

June 2, 1884
CLUB HOUSE RE-OPENS

With a dislocated shoulder, three lame horses and a penchant for flicking smouldering cigar butts at opponents, “the great club house fire of 83” is blamed on Lieut. Winston S. Churchill.

April 20, 1883
THE BANGALORE POLO CLUB BURNS DOWN

It was the Bangalore Polo Club that devised the regional competition and put forward the cup, therefore earning the right to host the final on home grounds against the fiercely competitive Dragon Guards. Captained by Lieut. Winston S. Churchill, a young cavalry officer at the time, The Dragons came to play and were a worthy adversary. Succumbing only in the last second of the final chukka.

April 20, 1883
THE INTER-REGIONAL CUP FINAL

The Bangalore Polo Club assists with the formation and funding of the national body The Indian Polo Association, further fuelling debate that they (the BPC) control and own the game in India. However, it was this very astute move and investment that allowed the BPC to withdraw from administrative duties and focus on the game itself. Without the establishment of the Indian Polo Association, the game may have faulted during World War II, only reinvigorating interest in the game with new rules and exhibition style matches that the BPC had proved were so popular with the masses.

November 11, 1882
THE INDIAN POLO ASSOCIATION

The London Chronicle is credited with penning this verse after the Badgers had handed a particularly ferocious beating to the local team at Hurlington resulting in the hospitalisation of three of their players and the death of the referee. Remove your boots and stow your pride The Badgers are out, they came to ride Unsaddle your horse and away your mallet Swig that drink to settle your palate I’ve told you once and I’ve told you twice The Badgers are out, run for your life Aggressive, impressive, fearless and brave You ride against them, you ride to your grave.

October 22, 1876
TEAM SONG PENNED IN ENGLAND

To celebrate the latest extension to the club house, the Duke arranged for a live Honey Badger to be gifted to the club as a team mascot. Released before the game against The Dragon Guards, the experiment failed as the Badger promptly attacked one of the horses with a fatal consequence and then disappeared into the club house only to be found by the cleaners in the early hours – upside down in a trophy full of Champagne.

May 1, 1864
MASCOT EXPERIMENT FAILS

In a final and dramatic protest of the new international rule (forbidding the carrying and discharging of firearms during play), Captain Catapult fires his last shot on field executing the opposing team’s prized attacking horse “Achilles”. At his trial, the Captain successfully argued self-defense and then proceeded to play all future matches with a holstered replica – much to the disgust and fear of all opposing teams.

August 16, 1863
LAST HORSE TO BE EXECUTED DURING PLAY

The young Maharaja plays his last game as the disguised stable hand nicknamed “The Joker”, before being “outed” as the Maharaja, thus putting an end to a short yet stunning career as a Number 3. Ever the practical joker, the Maharaja continued to haunt all other Number 3’s, inventing such classics as the loose saddle, the uneven stirrups, chilli powder in the underpants and his personal favourite, the pre-match laxative.

September 2, 1862
THE JOKER, PLAYS LAST GAME

Thus setting the first specific polo field in history, an impressive clubhouse was opened with an exhibition match between the Bangalore Badgers and the 15th Lancers from Calcutta. Such a resounding and savage beating was delivered to the team from Calcutta that they refuse to travel to Bangalore and have hosted the Badgers on very few occasions.

December 7, 1860
CLUB HOUSE OPENS

Thanks largely to the support of the Maharaja, The Bangalore Polo Club and their highly acclaimed team The Bangalore Badgers enjoy to this day, financial security that is the envy of all others bar none. It is not just money that has afforded this team numerous titles and trophies, but also the culture of the four founding members of aggression and sheer bloody mindedness that has been built upon by all team members since their first victory in February of 1859.

February 22, 1859
BANGALORE POLO CLUB OFFICIALLY FORMED

In February of 1859, a victorious polo team hailing from Bangalore, burst onto the scenes and stole the headlines and hearts of the nation. Originally thought to be an all women’s team, due to a mistake with uniform printers turning out their team shirts as The Bangalore Beavers.

February 3, 1859
BANGALORE BADGERS PLAY FIRST MATCH